1. INTRODUCTION

“The Co-Creation Co-Design Framework” (CCF) includes the collaboration and engagement of different stakeholders, including PPCP and experts in the field, as one of the central themes of the C2IMPRESS project. By involving these stakeholders, C2IMPRESS ensures that disaster management strategies and resilience plans are not only effective, but also inclusive and tailored to the specific needs of each community. The CCF serves as a platform for collective decision-making, knowledge sharing and resource pooling in the context of disaster management and crisis response.


Figure 1. CCF Diagram.

The CCF consists of a total of 6 phases, 4 consecutive and 2 intersecting each of them.

The KNOW phase is the first phase of the CCF and is directly related to the context of the CCF. The KNOW phase includes attempts to frame multiple disaster risks and potential stakeholders. In this context, it can be said that the KNOW phase has two broad objectives. First, the KNOW phase aims to map the disaster risk and vulnerability of the region and identify the needs, vulnerabilities and key actors that disaster risks pose by bringing together previously established datasets and citizen knowledge. The second broad objective of the KNOW phase is to identify, map and analyze potential stakeholders who could be involved as key actors in the subsequent phases of the CCF (e.g. raising awareness, co-creation and co-design).

The "RAISE AWARENESS" phase aims at informing citizens. In this context, the first objective of this phase is to provide information about the facts and the need to ensure that those affected are aware of the disasters. Secondly, the primary objective of the citizen engagement activities is to raise sufficient awareness and learning among key stakeholders and within the participating cities by introducing pragmatic and effective co-creation mechanisms to critically

evaluate proposed solutions in a timely manner. Finally, this phase aims to create awareness and willingness to participate and engage in an informed way.

In our CCF, the CO-CREATE phase is dedicated to shaping policy recommendations, strategies, and regulatory frameworks through collaborative efforts. On the other hand, the CO-DESIGN phase is geared towards the creation of tangible products such as software, applications or electronic/mechanical devices, with a focus on co-development. When a project requires a mix of both policy and practical product outcomes, we merge these two stages within our Living Lab environment, enabling a well-rounded and thorough development process.

One of the main objectives of OUTREACH is to raise awareness of the project's purpose, objectives and activities throughout the target audience. Another objective is to motivate the target audience to learn more about the project. An important objective is to engage with stakeholders who can contribute to the project, such as community members, organizations, government agencies or sector experts. When considering the scope of outreach, the first step is to determine the appropriate outreach strategy, considering the characteristics of the target audience. The most appropriate online or offline outreach strategy should be determined, considering the demographics, interests and behaviors of the target audience. The definition of indicators to measure the success of the outreach strategy, such as the number of participants reached, the level of participation or changes in perception or behavior, is also part of the outreach strategy.

The KEEP ENGAGE phase of the project has been linked to all other phases and separate strategies have been developed for each phase to ensure that the CCF process can run smoothly and that citizen participation and the knowledge generated can be sustained and transferred throughout the project and beyond. Sustainability is a very important goal for all similar projects. For this reason, the question of how to achieve and sustain stakeholder involvement was addressed as a phenomenon in each project. In the C2IMPRESS project it stands out as one of the distinctive features of the project. The CCF has positioned stakeholder engagement as a key principle at all stages. The main objective of the "keep engage" phase is to ensure that stakeholder engagement is not only achieved at each stage, but also sustained, and that stakeholder engagement and the project continue even after the project is completed and the budget is no longer available. All processes and tools developed during this phase are designed to achieve this goal.

The EVALUATION phase is one of the last and most important phases of the CCF. In this phase the other phases are evaluated. For these evaluation processes, various assessments have been made considering approaches such as sustainability, risk status, human factors, usability, computability, resilience and satisfaction.

One of the most unique aspects of this CCF is its modular design. Each phase is designed as a separate and self-contained project. If necessary, a phase can be implemented on its own and the process completed. The main reason for such a modular design is to maintain flexibility, especially for the solutions to be developed within the CCF. This is because each co-creation and co-design process is unique. If this uniqueness requires a redesign of a phase, which it may, the structure of the CCF and the positioning of the phases are very suitable for this.

The CCF Guide presents the preparatory stages of each phase of the developed framework, its structure, its implementation process, the characteristics of the tools developed and how they will be used.

In the CCF Guide we first present the preparatory stages of each phase. We have briefly defined the problem around which the phase is positioned and the type of problem to be prepared for. Within this preparation process, the number, functions and qualifications of the team members required for the phase are also defined.

The preparation phase is followed by the implementation plan. This briefly states that the actions, who will be responsible for the actions and what the outputs should be determined. It is also stated that the budget and timetable should also be determined here.

Finally, the details of the implementation phase are included. In the implementation phase it is defined which main work is included in the relevant phase, how this process will be carried out, what will be done in the relevant phase, what outputs are expected, how this phase relates to other phases and what tools will be developed and used for this phase. Details of each phase are given below.

2. KNOW

2.1 Preparation

i. Problem Definition: Clearly define the community exposed to disasters and the needs of the community in the face of disasters. Do not neglect important details when defining the community and its needs.


ii. Team Building: The team should consist of a maximum of 5-7 people under the leadership of 1 team leader. The team members can share the tasks of structuring the research methodology and data collection tools, collecting the data, preparing the data for analysis and analyzing the data. The team should have the following qualifications;


- Team Leader (1 people)


Role: Ensure seamless team interactions, timely progress, and maintain focus on the mapping community and need analysis objectives


Specifications:


  • Discussion Guidance & Conflict Resolution: Direct team discussions, mediate disagreements, and ensure productive outcomes.
  • Technical Proficiency: Assist with tool-related challenges, ensuring smooth operation.
  • Process & Feedback Management: Oversee the project's flow, integrating feedback and ensuring no step is missed.
  • Resource & Training Coordination: Manage resource allocation and organize necessary training for the team.


- Experts/Data Analysists (2-3 peoples):


Role: Defining the research methodology, determining the sampling technique and sample size, determining the data collection tools and sources (secondary data, questionnaire, focus group

interview forms), defining the validity and reliability of data collection tools, analyzing and reporting the data.


Specifications:


  • Expertise: Have the necessary and sufficient technical expertise to ensure that data is accurate and of high quality
  • Design: Designing data collection tools to obtain data from primary and secondary data sources.
  • Programming: Use the necessary and appropriate statistical tools to analyze and interpret data from data sets.
  • Reporting: Preparing final analysis reports so that all parties can understand the results of the data analysis



- Data Assistants (2-3 peoples):


Role: Collecting and organizing data using previously prepared data collection tools and making them ready for analysis.


Specifications:


  • Preparation for data collection: Scanning relevant datasets and transferring relevant secondary data to the database. Identifying appropriate data collection techniques (face-to-face, online, postal, e-mail, etc.) to reach more respondents. Transitioning the questionnaires to the relevant online (CEP) and offline forms. Organizing the groups to be interviewed in focus groups and keeping online/offline interview records.
  • Data collection: Collecting the necessary data through database searches, questionnaires and interviews.
  • Preparing data for analysis: Recording survey and database data by coding them into the relevant forms. Cleaning corrupted data and correcting coding errors or other problems. Transcribing and classifying the data collected through interview forms and recording these data on the relevant forms with the help of coding.



iii. Implementation Plan:


- Activities and deliverables definition and responsible assignment

To ensure the project's success, clear definitions of activities and associated deliverables will be established. Each task will be assigned to the appropriate team member based on expertise, ensuring accountability and precision in execution. This structured approach ensures that all team members have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities, promoting efficiency and coherence throughout the project's lifecycle.


- Resources and Budget


Resource allocation is pivotal for the smooth progression of any project. A detailed budget will be crafted, outlining the financial requirements for each phase of the project. This not only ensures optimal utilization of funds but also helps in forecasting any potential financial roadblocks. By mapping out resources in advance, the project can proceed without undue financial strain or unexpected shortages.


- Time-sheet


Time management is a cornerstone of effective project implementation. A comprehensive time-sheet will be developed, indicating the start and end dates for each activity, as well as milestones and checkpoints. This tool will serve as a visual representation of the project timeline, allowing for easy tracking of progress, ensuring timely delivery, and providing a mechanism for early detection of potential delays.

2.2 Implementation

2.2.1 Step 1: Mapping Community


This initial step aims to understand the community you're working with, including their socio-demographic characteristics, vulnerable groups, and relevant stakeholders.


a. Socio-demographic Analysis & Identification of Vulnerable Groups:


How to use: Use methods such as surveys, existing data review, focus groups, and community meetings to gather information on the socio-demographic characteristics of the community. This may include aspects like age, gender, occupation, income level, and more. Analyze the collected data to identify groups within the community who are particularly vulnerable to the disaster risk you're addressing. This could be due to factors like age, health status, living conditions, etc. Use methods such as interviews and focus groups to gather nuanced information


Expected Output: A comprehensive profile of the community's socio-demographic characteristics. A list of identified vulnerable groups in the community.


Relation to Other Phases: This data informs all subsequent phases, enabling targeted communication strategies (Outreach and Raise awareness), co-design of suitable solutions (Co-Design), development of relevant policies (Co-Creation), and identification of key individuals or groups for continued engagement (Keep Engaged). Identifying vulnerable groups will enable the development of targeted solutions in the Co-Design phase, inform relevant policy recommendations in the Co-Creation phase, guide strategies for inclusive communication in the Outreach phase, and highlight specific groups for engagement in the Keep Engaged phase.


Tools: Existing Data Review (Section I), Methodology (Sampling), Questionnaire (Section I) (Quantitative), Interview and Focus Group (Section I) (Qualitative)


b. Stakeholder Mapping


How to use: Identify and map out the key stakeholders involved in disaster risk mitigation and awareness in the community. This could include local government bodies, non-profit organizations,

community leaders, and more. Use techniques such as interviews and surveys to gather this information.


Expected Output: A visual map of the key stakeholders, showing their roles, relationships, and influence in the community.


Relation to Other Phases: The stakeholder map can guide the formation of collaborative partnerships in the Co-Design and Co-Creation phases, inform communication and engagement strategies in the Outreach, Raise Awareness and Keep Engaged phases.


Tools: PPCP report, Stakeholder List, Stakeholder Mind-Map

2.2.2 Step 2: Need Analysis

In this step, you'll evaluate the vulnerabilities, vulnerable groups, and participant characteristics revealed by the community mapping: [1] [2] [3] [MHT4]

How to use: Review the information from the community mapping process, particularly focusing on the identified vulnerable groups. Discuss with your team and, if possible, with representatives from the vulnerable groups, to understand their specific needs and challenges related to disaster risk. Techniques such as focus groups and interviews can be particularly useful for these discussions. Look at the participant list and characteristics derived from the mapping community step. Consider how these characteristics might influence the needs, perspectives, and potential contributions of these participants in the co-creation process. Surveys, focus groups and interviews can be used to gather more detailed information.


Expected Output: A detailed understanding of the vulnerabilities within the community, including specific challenges faced by vulnerable groups. An understanding of how participant characteristics might influence the co-creation process, informing your approach in later steps.


Relation to Other Phases: This assessment informs the prioritization of problems to be addressed in the Co-Design and Co-Creation phases and highlights key issues to be communicated in the Outreach phase. This evaluation helps in tailoring the engagement strategies in the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases, and ensures the perspectives of different participants are considered in the Co-Design and Co-Creation phases


Tools: Existing Data Review (Section II), Methodology (Sampling), Questionnaire (Section II) (Quantitative), Interview and Focus Group (Section II) (Qualitative), Interest-Influence Matrix, Rainbow Diagram, Power-Vulnerability Wheel

3. RAISE AWARENESS

3.1 Preparation

i. Problem Definition: Raising awareness is a critical and foundational step in the citizen engagement process. In essence, raising awareness is not just about disseminating information; it is a fundamental step towards creating an engaged, informed, and participatory citizenry that actively contributes to the well-being and development of their communities. Explore effective communication strategies for raising awareness. This includes utilizing social media, community events, and other channels to reach a diverse audience and foster engagement.


ii. Team Building: The team should consist of a maximum of 3-5 people under the leadership of 1 team leader. Team members can share the tasks of preparing the communication strategy, media relations and event management. The team should have the following qualifications;


- Team Leader (1 people)


Role: Ensure seamless team interactions, timely progress, and maintain focus on the communication strategies, media relations and events objectives.


Competences:


Campaign Planning and Execution: Expertise in planning, organizing, and executing comprehensive awareness campaigns from inception to completion.


Media Relations: Experience in building and maintaining positive relationships with media outlets to secure coverage and enhance campaign visibility.


Community Engagement: Proven ability to engage with diverse communities, understanding their needs, and fostering inclusive participation in the campaign.


Collaboration and Networking: Strong networking skills to collaborate with community leaders, influencers, and organizations that can enhance the campaign's reach and impact.


Crisis Management: Ability to navigate and manage crises or unforeseen challenges that may arise during the campaign.


Evaluation and Reporting: Competence in evaluating the success of the campaign and preparing comprehensive reports for stakeholders.


Experience in Similar Campaigns: Previous experience in leading successful awareness campaigns, especially in related fields or industries.


Educational Background: Relevant educational background in fields such as communications, marketing, public relations, or community development.


- Director of Communication Strategy (1 people)


Role: Responsible for the preparation and execution of the communication plan. Ensures harmonisation between media relations and events. Analyses and reports the evaluations at the end of the communication activities.


Competences:

Campaign Planning and Execution: Expertise in planning, organizing, and executing comprehensive awareness campaigns from inception to completion.


Media Relations: Experience in building and maintaining positive relationships with media outlets to secure coverage and enhance campaign visibility.


Community Engagement: Proven ability to engage with diverse communities, understanding their needs, and fostering inclusive participation in the campaign.


Collaboration and Networking: Strong networking skills to collaborate with community leaders, influencers, and organizations that can enhance the campaign's reach and impact.


Crisis Management: Ability to navigate and manage crises or unforeseen challenges that may arise during the campaign.


Evaluation and Reporting: Competence in evaluating the success of the campaign and preparing comprehensive reports for stakeholders.


Experience in Similar Campaigns: Previous experience in leading successful awareness campaigns, especially in related fields or industries.


Educational Background: Relevant educational background in fields such as communications, marketing, public relations, or community development.


- Director of Media Relations (1-2 people)


Role: Responsible for the preparation and execution of the media plan. Develops close relations with the media and media professionals. Ensures media coverage of the project and stakeholders. It also carries out social media management.


Competences:


Media Relations: Experience in building and maintaining positive relationships with media outlets to secure coverage and enhance campaign visibility.


Collaboration and Networking: Strong networking skills to collaborate with community leaders, influencers, and organizations that can enhance the campaign's reach and impact.


Crisis Management: Ability to navigate and manage crises or unforeseen challenges that may arise during the campaign.


Evaluation and Reporting: Competence in evaluating the success of the campaign and preparing comprehensive reports for stakeholders.


- Director of Events (1-2 people)


Role: Responsible for the preparation and execution of the event plan. Prepares checklists for events. Responsible for the smooth implementation and reporting of the events.


Competences:


Campaign Planning and Execution: Expertise in planning, organizing, and executing comprehensive awareness campaigns from inception to completion.


Community Engagement: Proven ability to engage with diverse communities, understanding their needs, and fostering inclusive participation in the campaign.


Crisis Management: Ability to navigate and manage crises or unforeseen challenges that may arise during the campaign.


Evaluation and Reporting: Competence in evaluating the success of the campaign and preparing comprehensive reports for stakeholders.


iii. Implementation Plan:


- Activities and deliverables definition and responsible assignment in Strategic Communication Plan

To ensure the project's success, clear definitions of activities and associated deliverables will be established. Each task will be assigned to the appropriate team member based on expertise. This structured approach ensures that all team members have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities, promoting efficiency and coherence throughout the strategic communication plan.


- Resources and Budget


Resource allocation is pivotal for the smooth progression of any project. A detailed budget will be crafted, outlining the financial requirements for each phase of the plan. This not only ensures optimal utilization of funds but also helps in forecasting any potential financial roadblocks. By mapping out resources in advance, the plan can proceed without undue financial strain or unexpected shortages.


- Time-sheet


Time management is a cornerstone of effective project implementation. A comprehensive time-sheet (Gantt Chart) will be developed, indicating the start and end dates for each activity, as well as milestones and checkpoints. This tool will serve as a visual representation of the project timeline, allowing for easy tracking of progress, ensuring timely delivery, and providing a mechanism for early detection of potential delays.

3.2 Implementation

3.2.1 Step 1: Communication Strategies and Media Relations


Communication strategies ensure that campaign messages are clear, concise, and consistent across all channels. Consistent messaging enhances recognition and reinforces key points in the minds of the audience. Strategic communication plans identify and target specific audience segments. Media relations help in securing coverage in outlets that cater to the identified audience, maximizing the reach of the awareness campaign. Media relations amplify key messages by securing coverage in influential media outlets. Strategic partnerships with media help disseminate information to a broader audience, enhancing the impact of the campaign. Media coverage builds credibility and trust among the audience. Positive media relations contribute to the perceived legitimacy of the awareness campaign and its objectives. Communication strategies adapt messages to various communication platforms, including traditional media, social media, and community events. This adaptability ensures that the campaign reaches individuals through their preferred channels. Effective communication fosters community engagement by encouraging two-way communication. Media relations can facilitate community discussions and feedback through interviews, articles, or features. Communication strategies include plans for crisis communication. Media relations expertise

helps in managing and shaping narratives during challenging situations, mitigating potential damage to the campaign's reputation. Communication strategies incorporate measurement and analytics tools to assess the impact of the campaign. Media relations efforts are evaluated based on metrics such as media reach, audience engagement, and sentiment analysis. Communication plans identify key stakeholders and include strategies for engaging them. Media relations efforts involve building relationships with stakeholders, including journalists, influencers, and community leaders. Communication strategies prioritize transparency and authenticity in messaging. Media relations professionals work to ensure that media coverage reflects the campaign's commitment to honesty and sincerity. Media relations involve various strategies to interact with the media and to share the intended message with the larger community.


Planning and Content Developing

How to use: Define communication strategies, enhance content, and align target groups with appropriate communication methods/tools.


Expected Output: A detailed communication strategy, engaging content, and an understanding of which communication methods are best suited to reach different target groups.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool is closely related to the Know phase as it relies on a detailed understanding of the community, their characteristics, and their needs. Also this tool support Outreach and Keep Engage phases.


Tools: Socio-demographic Analysis and Communication Strategy Plan Document


Platform: Communication Strategy Plan Document


Advertisement

How to use: Utilize various platforms like posters, billboards, public schools, prayer places, community centers, all public spaces, SMS, and door-to-door visits.


Expected Output: Increased visibility and awareness among the community (Visibility Report).


Relation with Other Phases: This tool supports the Outreach and Co-Creation Co Design phase by making the community aware of the project and encouraging participation.


Tools: Identification of Vulnerable Groups, Stakeholder Mappings, Media Planning Strategy Document


Platform: Media Planning Strategy Document


News and Program

How to use: Publish news and/or interview in national and local newspapers, appear on TV, radio, podcast, and YouTube channels.


Expected Output: Broader community engagement and awareness of the project (Visibility Report).


Relation with Other Phases: This tool supports the Outreach and Co-Creation Co Design phase by reaching a larger audience and promoting the project.

Tools: Socio-demographic Analysis and Communication Strategy Plan Document


Platform: Media Records


Media Meetings

How to use: Organize media meetings and breakfasts (at both national and local levels).


Expected Output: Stronger relationships with media representatives, increased media coverage.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool is linked to the Outreach and Keep Engage phase by promoting the project to a wider audience.


Tools: Media and Media Professionals Mapping


Platform: Media and Media Professionals Data


New Media and Website

How to use: Utilize new media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, Linkedn, SMS for communication and engagement.


Expected Output: Engaged online community, broader reach, and higher project visibility.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool aids the Outreach and Keep Engage phase by reaching a wider, potentially global audience.


Tools: Socio-demographic Analysis, Communication Strategy Plan Document, and Media Planning Strategy Document


Platform: Media Records (Visual, written, etc.)


3.2.2 Step 2: Events


Events can be a powerful way to engage the community, raise awareness about disaster risks, and motivate participation in the project. Events play a crucial role in raising awareness campaigns by providing tangible opportunities for direct engagement with the community. Events facilitate face-to-face interactions, allowing campaign organizers to directly engage with community members. Personal interactions build trust, understanding, and a stronger connection between the campaign and its audience. Events provide a platform for community members to come together, fostering a sense of belonging and community spirit. Community building is essential for sustained engagement beyond the duration of the campaign. Live events allow for the demonstration of key campaign messages or initiatives. Hands-on experiences and demonstrations create memorable impressions and reinforce the campaign's objectives. Events offer an opportunity to share in-depth information about the campaign's mission, goals, and impact. Presentations, workshops, and panel discussions provide a comprehensive understanding for attendees. Events can be tailored to specific neighborhoods or cultural groups, ensuring that the campaign's messages are locally relevant. Localized events enhance inclusivity and resonance with diverse segments of the community. Events provide a platform for collecting real-time feedback and input from attendees. This direct feedback loop is valuable for refining campaign strategies and addressing community concerns. Events facilitate networking and collaboration among community members, stakeholders, and campaign organizers. Building connections during events can lead to collaborative efforts that extend the reach and impact of the campaign. Events offer an opportunity to showcase partnerships with local businesses, organizations, and influencers. Partner involvement enhances the credibility of the campaign and broadens its reach. Events allow for the incorporation of cultural elements and practices that resonate with the community. Cultural sensitivity enhances inclusivity and ensures that the campaign is well-received by diverse audiences. Events provide a visually impactful platform for showcasing campaign visuals, such as banners, displays, and multimedia presentations. Visual elements reinforce campaign messages and make a lasting impression on attendees. Interactive activities, such as workshops, games, or demonstrations, make the campaign more engaging and memorable. Attendees actively participate, fostering a deeper connection with the campaign's objectives. Events serve as touchpoints for initiating follow-up engagement with attendees. Post-event communication, such as newsletters or social media updates, sustains interest and involvement. Events offer educational opportunities, such as expert talks or informational sessions, to enhance the audience's understanding of campaign issues. Educational components empower community members to make informed decisions.


a. Talks

How to use: Organize talks (seminars/panels) for citizens, with experts meeting with citizens.


Expected Output: Increased community understanding and engagement with disaster risks and mitigation strategies.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool supports the Outreach and Co-Creation Co Design phase by educating the community and inviting participation.

Tools: Event Check List


Platform: Event Check List, Feedback Form


b. Stalls and Home Visiting

How to use: Set up stalls in public spaces with volunteers, youth, and older people. Home visiting target specific vulnerable citizen groups that would not naturally participate in public hearings or town meetings.


Expected Output: Direct community engagement, distribution of educational materials, increased project visibility.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool supports both the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases, providing a platform for ongoing community engagement and participation. Also this tool supports Co-Creation Co Design phase by getting suggestions from citizens.


Tools: Event Check List


Platform: Event Check List and Feedback Form


c. Trainings

How to use: Capacity building trainings for citizens in particularly volunteers, youth, and older people.


Expected Output: Capacity building for the engagement process, engage the co creation and co design phases.


Relation with Other Phases: This tool supports both the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases, providing a platform for ongoing community engagement and participation. Also this tool supports Co-Creation Co Design phase by getting suggestions from citizens.


Tools: Event Check List


Platform: Training Evaluation Forms

4. CO-CREATE

4.1 Preparation for Living Lab


Problem Definition and Process Planning


i. Problem Definition: Identify the policy issue that needs to be addressed. The issue must be compatible with the policy requirement section in the Need Analysis Report (KNOW phase). This should be a clear, concise statement that guides the entire process.


Plan how the co-creation process will proceed


ii. Team Building: The team can consist of 1 facilitator, 2 people for moderation, 2 people to help with moderation and 2 people to work on document analysis and preparation. The team has these specifications:


Facilitator (1 people)


Role: Ensure seamless team interactions, timely progress, and maintain focus on the co-creation and co-design objectives.


Specifications:


Discussion Guidance & Conflict Resolution: Direct team discussions, mediate disagreements, and ensure productive outcomes.


Technical Proficiency: Assist with tool-related challenges, ensuring smooth operation.


Process & Feedback Management: Oversee the project's flow, integrating feedback and ensuring no step is missed.


Resource & Training Coordination: Manage resource allocation and organize necessary training for the team.


Experience & Competency: Should be experienced in the problem area.


Moderator (2 people):


Role: Guide discussions, maintain a participatory and respectful environment.


Specifications:


Communication & Neutrality: Strong facilitation skills, with an emphasis on unbiased listening.


Subject Expertise: Familiarity with co-creation and co-design principles.


Experience & Adaptability: Prior facilitation experience and the ability to adapt to dynamic discussions.


Assistant (2 people):


Role: Support logistics, technical aspects, and unforeseen challenges.


Specifications:


Technical & Organizational Proficiency: Handle logistical and platform-related details seamlessly.


Support Skills: Ability to step in for moderation and manage time effectively.


Document Analyzer & Sharer (2 people):


Role: Synthesize feedback into actionable insights and share findings.


Specifications:


Analysis & Detail: Skill in data analysis and spotting patterns, with attention to all feedback nuances.


Communication & Technical Skills: Ability to craft clear reports and use relevant analysis tools.


Ethical Responsibility: Prioritize participant confidentiality and data transparency.


iii. Implementation Plan:



Activities and deliverables definition and responsible assignment


To ensure the project's success, clear definitions of activities and associated deliverables will be established. Each task will be assigned to the appropriate team member based on expertise, ensuring accountability and precision in execution. This structured approach ensures that all team members

have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities, promoting efficiency and coherence throughout the project's lifecycle.


Resources and Budget


Resource allocation is pivotal for the smooth progression of any project. A detailed budget will be crafted, outlining the financial requirements for each phase of the project. This not only ensures optimal utilization of funds but also helps in forecasting any potential financial roadblocks. By mapping out resources in advance, the project can proceed without undue financial strain or unexpected shortages.


Evaluation:


During the co-creation phase, how effectively were resources and budget managed?


a) Optimally with no issues.


b) Minor deviations but managed well.


c) Occasional discrepancies and challenges.


d) Significant mismanagement and disruptions.


Time-sheet


Time management is a cornerstone of effective project implementation. A comprehensive time-sheet will be developed, indicating the start and end dates for each activity, as well as milestones and checkpoints. This tool will serve as a visual representation of the project timeline, allowing for easy tracking of progress, ensuring timely delivery, and providing a mechanism for early detection of potential delays.


Selection of Experts and Citizens


Experts: Based on the results of the stakeholder mapping (KNOW phase), care should be taken to select the experts to be included as participants from university, public, private, NGO and civil experts according to the quintuple helix of stakeholders. The main and reserve list should be determined separately in case the selected participants cannot attend.

Identify and invite a panel of experts with diverse backgrounds and experiences relevant to the policy issue at hand. This could include practitioners, academics, representatives from affected communities, and policymakers.


Citizens: Based on the results of the mapping community (KNOW phase), one person should be selected to represent those with high results in the power-interest matrix.


Evaluation:


Citizens:


Evaluate the compatibility of the invited citizens in relation to the power-interest matrix (very compatible, compatible, neither compatible nor not compatible, not compatible).


Experts:


Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from the university.


Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from the public sector.


Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from the private sector.


Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from NGOs.


Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from civil experts.


Informing Participants and Sharing Documents


Give information on the rationale and importance of the chosen problem. Mention about how the process will proceed. Present the need analysis (KNOW phase) report summary and share this report with the participants.


Preparation for Survey (1’st round)


- Creation of First Questionnaire Creation


How to use: Develop open-ended questions that encourage in-depth responses. These questions should prompt participants to identify potential solutions, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and consider their impact on different stakeholder groups. Be sure to include questions that specifically ask about the citizens' experiences, needs, and ideas.


Expected Output: A comprehensive questionnaire for the first round of the Delphi study.


Relation to Other Phases: The issues explored in the questionnaire are informed by the findings in the Need Analysis Report (KNOW phase). The results of this questionnaire will feed into the second round of questionnaires, and the solutions generated will inform the engagement strategies in the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases


4.2 Execution of LL


First Round of Questionnaires


In this step, you'll create and distribute an initial questionnaire designed to explore the policy issue. Experts and selected representative citizens should be encouraged to identify potential policy alternatives, discuss their pros and cons, and consider the implications for different stakeholders. In addition, participants should be asked open-ended questions about the criteria that should be considered when choosing between policy alternatives.


Questionnaire Distribution


How to use: Distribute the questionnaire to the selected experts and citizens. This could be done via email, an online survey platform, or in-person meetings.


Expected Output: Completed questionnaires from all participants, providing a diverse range of insights and ideas.


Relation to Other Phases: The distribution process relies on stakeholder mapping carried out in the Know phase, and the results will inform the second round of questionnaires and Outreach phases.


Remember that the Policy Delphi process is iterative, and it's essential to carefully analyze the responses from each round to inform the design of the next questionnaire. The citizen's perspectives and expert opinions gathered during this step will inform the following steps of the co-design process, ensuring that the solutions designed are effective and meet the needs of your target audience.


Analysis of First Round Responses


Analyze the responses and summarize the key points, areas of agreement, and areas of disagreement. Highlight the range of policy alternatives proposed by the experts. Cluster these suggestions and criterias and for each cluster write a comprehensive statement to be scored in the second round.


Expected Deliverable: A summary document highlighting the main findings from the first round.

Second Round of Questionnaires


In this step, you'll conduct the second round of questionnaires based on the analysis of responses from the first round. During this round, participants (both citizens and experts) will be asked to rank the policy alternatives that were identified in the previous round according to the criteria.


a. Questionnaire Creation


How to use: Create a questionnaire that asks participants to rank the policy alternatives identified in the first round based on specific criteria such as feasibility, potential impact, and alignment with the needs and priorities identified earlier. Provide a summary of the first-round responses to inform the participants' rankings.


Expected Output: A comprehensive questionnaire for the second round of the Delphi study.


Relation to Other Phases: The issues addressed in this questionnaire build on the results of the first round of questionnaires, as well as engagement and communication strategies in the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases.


b. Questionnaire Distribution and Collection


How to use: Distribute the questionnaire to the selected citizens first and ask them to rank the policy alternatives. Collect their responses once completed.


After collecting the responses from citizens, share their rankings and comments with the expert group. Encourage experts to consider citizens' perspectives when providing their own rankings.


Expected Output: Completed questionnaires from all participants with rankings of policy alternatives.


Relation to Other Phases: This step builds on the stakeholder engagement from the first round of questionnaires and the Know phase. The ranked policy alternatives will also guide communication strategies in the Outreach phase and targeted engagement in the Keep Engaged phase.



The ranking process in this round is designed to help you identify the most promising policy alternatives based on a wide range of perspectives. By letting citizens score first and then allowing experts to see these scores and comments, you ensure that citizen's voices are central to the process and their insights directly inform the experts' evaluation.


Analysis of Second Round Responses and Preparation of Final Report


Analyze the responses from the second round and prepare a final report. This should include an overview of the process, a summary of the findings, a detailed exploration of the different policy alternatives and viewpoints, and an analysis of the ranking results.


Expected Deliverable: Final report detailing the process, findings, potential policy alternatives, and their rankings.


4.3 Preparation of Dissemination Plan and Writing Final Report


a. Identifying Key Messages and Audiences:


How to Use: Focus on the significant outcomes and policy recommendations generated during the co-creation phase. Determine the essential messages and identify the target audiences, such as community members, stakeholders, or policymakers, who need to be informed.


Expected Output: A defined set of key messages and a list of target audiences.


Relation to Other Phases: This step uses the insights from the Know and Co-Creation phases to ensure the messages are impactful. The audiences should be those engaged in or affected by these phases, ensuring relevance and impact.


b. Choosing Appropriate Channels and Tools:


How to Use: Select channels and tools that effectively reach your audiences. These might include social media, websites, press releases, public events, or academic publications, depending on the audience.


Expected Output: A dissemination plan detailing the chosen communication channels and tools.


Relation to Other Phases: The channels and tools should align with those used in the Outreach and Keep Engaged phases to ensure consistency in communication.


c. Timeline and Responsibilities:

How to Use: Create a timeline for the dissemination activities, outlining when each activity should take place. Assign clear responsibilities to team members for each task.


Expected Output: A detailed schedule for dissemination activities and assigned responsibilities.


Relation to Other Phases: This step coordinates dissemination with ongoing activities in the Keep Engaged phase and follows up on actions from the Co-Design and Co-Creation phases.


Step 2: Writing Final Report


a. Compiling Data and Findings:


How to Use: Collect all relevant data, findings, user feedback, and outcomes from the Co-Creation phase. This should include statistical data, qualitative insights, and outcomes of policy recommendations.


Expected Output: A comprehensive report of project data and findings.


Relation to Other Phases: This step consolidates the entire project's work, incorporating data and insights from all previous phases, especially Co-Creation.


b. Drafting the Report:


How to Use: Begin drafting the report, ensuring it clearly outlines the project’s objectives, methodology, findings, and conclusions. Incorporate visuals and graphs for enhanced clarity.


Expected Output: An initial draft of the final report.


Relation to Other Phases: The report serves as a formal documentation of the project, from the Know phase through to the Keep Engaged phase.


c. Review and Finalization:


How to Use: Conduct internal reviews of the report and consider external feedback from stakeholders or experts. Revise the report based on this feedback.


Expected Output: A finalized, polished report ready for dissemination.


Relation to Other Phases: This step ensures the report accurately reflects the project's journey and is appropriate for sharing with stakeholders involved in various phases.


d. Dissemination of the Report:


How to Use: Distribute the final report to stakeholders, funders, and other relevant audiences as identified in your dissemination plan, using the selected channels and tools.


Expected Output: Broad distribution of the final report, increasing the project’s visibility and impact.


Relation to Other Phases: This final step ensures the project's findings and successes are shared widely, reinforcing efforts made in earlier phases and potentially influencing future projects or policy decisions.

5. CO-DESIGN

5.1 Step 1: Preparation for Living Lab

Problem Definition and Process Planning 

Problem Definition: Identify the content that can be addressed through policy from the need analysis report (KNOW phase). This should be a clear, concise statement that guides the entire process. 

Plan how the co-creation process will proceed

i. Team Building: The team can consist of 1 facilitator, 2 people for moderation, 2 people to help with moderation and 2 people to work on document analysis and preparation. The team has these specifications: 

Facilitator (1 people) 

Role: Ensure seamless team interactions, timely progress, and maintain focus on the co-creation and co-design objectives. 

Specifications:  

Discussion Guidance & Conflict Resolution: Direct team discussions, mediate disagreements, and ensure productive outcomes. 

Technical Proficiency: Assist with tool-related challenges, ensuring smooth operation. 

Process & Feedback Management: Oversee the project's flow, integrating feedback and ensuring no step is missed. 

Resource & Training Coordination: Manage resource allocation and organize necessary training for the team. 

Moderator (2 people):

Role: Guide discussions, maintain a participatory and respectful environment. 

Specifications: 

Communication & Neutrality: Strong facilitation skills, with an emphasis on unbiased listening. 

Subject Expertise: Familiarity with co-creation and co-design principles. 

Experience & Adaptability: Prior facilitation experience and the ability to adapt to dynamic discussions.  

Assistant (2 people): 

Role: Support logistics, technical aspects, and unforeseen challenges. 

Specifications: 

Technical & Organizational Proficiency: Handle logistical and platform-related details seamlessly. 

Support Skills: Ability to step in for moderation and manage time effectively. 

Document Analyzer & Sharer (2 people): 

Role: Synthesize feedback into actionable insights and share findings. 

Specifications: 

Analysis & Detail: Skill in data analysis and spotting patterns, with attention to all feedback nuances. 

Communication & Technical Skills: Ability to craft clear reports and use relevant analysis tools. 

Ethical Responsibility: Prioritize participant confidentiality and data transparency.

ii. Implementation Plan: 

Activities and deliverables definition and responsible assignment 

To ensure the project's success, clear definitions of activities and associated deliverables will be established. Each task will be assigned to the appropriate team member based on expertise, ensuring accountability and precision in execution. This structured approach ensures that all team members have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities, promoting efficiency and coherence throughout the project's lifecycle.

Resources and Budget 

Resource allocation is pivotal for the smooth progression of any project. A detailed budget will be crafted, outlining the financial requirements for each phase of the project. This not only ensures optimal utilization of funds but also helps in forecasting any potential financial roadblocks. By mapping out resources in advance, the project can proceed without undue financial strain or unexpected shortages. 

Time-sheet 

Time management is a cornerstone of effective project implementation. A comprehensive time sheet will be developed, indicating the start and end dates for each activity, as well as milestones and checkpoints. This tool will serve as a visual representation of the project timeline, allowing for easy tracking of progress, ensuring timely delivery, and providing a mechanism for early detection of potential delays.

Selection of Experts and Citizens 

Experts: Based on the results of the stakeholder mapping (KNOW), care should be taken to select the experts to be included as participants from university, public, private, NGO and civil experts according to the quintuple helix of stakeholders. The main and reserve list should be determined separately in case the selected participants cannot attend. 

Identify and invite a panel of experts with diverse backgrounds and experiences relevant to the policy issue at hand. This could include practitioners, academics, representatives from affected communities, and policymakers. 

Citizens: Based on the results of the mapping community (KNOW), one person should be selected to represent those with high results in the power-interest matrix. 

Informing Participants and Sharing Documents 

Give information on the rationale and importance of the chosen problem. Mention about how the process will proceed. Present the need analysis (KNOW) report summary and share this report with the participants.

5.2 Step 2: Execution of LLs

Personas and Feature Brainstorming Workshop 

i. Creating Personas: 

Personas are fictional characters, which you create based upon your research in order to represent the different user types that might use your service, product, site, or brand in a similar way. Creating personas will help you to understand your users' needs, experiences, behaviors, and goals. 

How to use: Begin by conducting user research through methods like interviews, surveys, and observation to gather data about your potential users. Based on your research, identify the key user types and create a detailed persona for each. Each persona should include demographic details, needs, goals, and behavioral patterns. 

Expected Output: Detailed personas representing your user types. 

Relation to Other Phases: The creation of personas is informed by the findings from the Know phase and helps guide the Feature Brainstorming, Wireframing, and Prototyping steps in the Co-Design phase. The personas also inform the outreach strategies in the Outreach phase and the engagement strategies in the Keep Engaged phase.

ii.. Feature Brainstorming: 

Once you've developed personas and understand your users' needs, you can start brainstorming features that could meet those needs. 

How to use: Organize a group brainstorming session, where team members and stakeholders propose and discuss potential features. Encourage participants to consider the needs and goals of your personas when suggesting features. 

Expected Output: A list of potential features, along with descriptions of how they meet user needs. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step builds on the problem definition and persona creation and directly informs the Wireframing and Prototyping steps of the Co-Design phase. The generated feature ideas can also be communicated in the Outreach phase and tested for engagement in the Keep Engaged phase.

Wireframing and Prototyping 

i. Wireframing 

Wireframing is the practice of creating a simplified visual guide to the layout of your application or platform. 

How to use: Based on the features identified in the brainstorming session, start sketching the layout of these features on each screen of the application or platform. At this stage, the focus should be on the functionality rather than the visual design. 

Expected Output: Wireframes for each screen showing the placement and arrangement of features. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step builds on the Feature Brainstorming, and the wireframes will be further developed and refined in the Prototyping and Usability Testing steps of the Co Design phase. The wireframes can also be shared in the Outreach phase to give potential users a preview of the solution.

ii. Prototyping 

A prototype is a draft version of a product that allows you to explore your ideas and show the intention behind a feature or the overall design concept to users before implementation. 

How to use: From your wireframes, develop a clickable prototype of your application or platform. Prototypes can be developed using prototyping software like Sketch, InVision, or Adobe XD. 

Expected Output: An interactive prototype of your product. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step directly builds on the Wireframing step and sets the stage for Usability Testing. The prototypes can also be shared and demonstrated in the Outreach phase and used to gather user feedback in the Keep Engaged Phase.

Usability Testing 

Usability Testing is a technique used to evaluate a product (in this case, your prototype) by testing it with real users. Users are asked to complete tasks, while you observe, record, and analyze what they do and what problems they encounter. 

How to use: Select some users that match your personas. Give them tasks to complete using the prototype. Record their interactions and ask them to think out loud while they're using the prototype. After the test, ask them for feedback about their experience. 

Expected Output: Insights into how users interact with your product, identification of usability issues, and actionable feedback for improving the product design. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step builds on the Prototyping and the feedback gathered is crucial for refining the design. The findings from Usability Testing may also inform strategies in the Outreach phase (showcasing user-approved designs can increase interest) and the Keep Engaged phase (the feedback can inform continuous improvements and user engagement strategies).

5.3.Step 3: Evaluation, Preparation of Dissemination Plan and Writing Final Report

a. Identifying Key Messages and Audiences: 

How to Use: Focus on the unique solutions and innovations developed during the co-design phase. Identify the key messages that emerged from this process and the target audiences who would benefit from or be interested in these insights (e.g., design communities, project stakeholders, potential users). 

Expected Output: A clear set of key messages and a list of target audiences relevant to the co-design outcomes. 

Relation to Other Phases: Utilizes insights from the Know and Co-Design phases to craft messages that highlight the collaborative and innovative aspects of the co-design process. This step ensures that the messaging resonates with those involved or impacted by these phases. 

b. Choosing Appropriate Channels and Tools: 

How to Use: Select the most effective channels and tools for reaching your identified audiences. Consider channels that are commonly used in design communities, such as professional networks, design showcases, online forums, and industry publications. 

Expected Output: A tailored dissemination plan that outlines the channels and tools to be used for communicating the co-design results. 

Relation to Other Phases: Aligns with the engagement strategies used in the Outreach phase and supports the ongoing engagement in the Keep Engaged phase, ensuring a consistent and effective communication approach. 

c. Timeline and Responsibilities: 

How to Use: Develop a timeline for your dissemination activities, detailing when and how each activity will be carried out. Assign responsibilities to team members for each dissemination task. 

Expected Output: A comprehensive schedule for dissemination activities, with clear responsibilities assigned. 

Relation to Other Phases: Ensures that the dissemination is synchronized with activities in the Keep Engaged phase and builds upon the work done in the Co-Design phase.

Writing Final Report for Co-Design Phase 

a. Compiling Co-Design Data and Insights: 

How to Use: Gather all relevant data, prototypes, user feedback, design iterations, and outcomes from the co-design phase. This should include detailed descriptions of the design process, challenges encountered, and the solutions developed. 

Expected Output: A comprehensive compilation of co-design data and insights. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step synthesizes the entire co-design process, ensuring that the report accurately captures the collaborative, creative efforts and the innovative solutions developed. 

b. Drafting the Report: 

How to Use: Begin drafting the report, structuring it to clearly convey the objectives, methodology, findings, and conclusions of the co-design phase. Include visuals and graphics to illustrate the design process and outcomes. 

Expected Output: An initial draft of the final report, specifically focused on the co-design phase. 

Relation to Other Phases: The report serves as a formal documentation of the co-design process, encapsulating the innovative and collaborative efforts from the Know phase through to the Keep Engaged phase. 

c. Review and Finalization: 

How to Use: Review the report internally and consider seeking external feedback from design experts or stakeholders. Revise the report based on this feedback. 

Expected Output: A finalized, polished report ready for dissemination. 

Relation to Other Phases: Ensures that the report accurately reflects the co-design journey and is suitable for sharing with stakeholders involved in various phases, as well as informing future design initiatives. 

d. Dissemination of the Report: 

How to Use: Distribute the final report to stakeholders, design communities, funders, and other relevant audiences as identified in your dissemination plan, using the selected channels and tools. 

Expected Output: Effective dissemination of the co-design phase results, enhancing understanding and appreciation of the co-designed solutions. 

Relation to Other Phases: This final step ensures the project's innovative design efforts are recognized and utilized by relevant audiences, reinforcing efforts made in earlier phases and potentially influencing future co-design projects or collaborations.

Evaluate the compatibility of the invited citizens in relation to the power-interest matrix (very compatible, compatible, neither compatible nor not compatible, not compatible). 

Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from the university. 

Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from the public sector. 

Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from NGOs. 

Evaluate the compatibility of the problem area with the background of the experts selected from civil society.

6. KEEP ENGAGED  

6.1 Preparation

i. Problem Definition: 

Keeping engagement is critical for the long-term success and impact of a project. Involving key stakeholders increases the likelihood of achieving desired outcomes and leaving a positive, lasting effect on the targeted audience or community. This phase is essential for maintaining collaboration, preserving knowledge, fostering innovation, promoting ownership and commitment, building community, and ensuring ongoing success. Keeping active participation is crucial for preserving knowledge and expertise within the project. This ongoing engagement supports a continuous exchange of ideas, fosters innovation, and encourages individuals to contribute creative solutions. Consistent involvement can also lead to a sense of ownership and commitment among participants, driving higher levels of dedication and accountability. Furthermore, long-term engagement nurtures a community spirit among project members that extends beyond the duration of the project, fostering networks and relationships for potential future collaborations or partnerships.

ii. Team Building: 

- Team Leader (1 people) 

Role: Ensure seamless team interactions, timely progress, and maintain focus on implementation of the phase’s objectives.

Qualifications: 

- Discussion Guidance & Conflict Resolution: Direct team discussions, mediate disagreements, and ensure productive outcomes. 

- Technical Proficiency: Assist with tool-related challenges, ensuring smooth operation.

-  Process & Feedback Management: Oversee the project's flow, integrating feedback and ensuring no step is missed. 

- Resource & Training Coordination: Manage resource allocation and organize necessary training for the team.

- Experts/Data Analysists (2-3 people): 

Role: Defining the qualitative (in-depth interviews, focus group interviews) and quantitative research methodology, determining the sampling technique and sample size, determining the data collection tools and sources (questionnaire, focus group interview forms, qualitative interview forms), defining the validity and reliability of the data collection tools, analyzing and reporting the data. 

Qualifications: 

- Expertise: Having the necessary and sufficient technical expertise to ensure that data is accurate and of high quality 

- Design: Designing the necessary data collection tools to obtain data from primary and secondary data sources. 

- Programming: Use the necessary and appropriate statistical tools to analyze and interpret the data in the data sets. 

- Reporting: Prepare final analysis reports so that all parties can understand the results of the data analysis.

- Media Expert (1-2 people) 

Role: To be able to make camera recordings during the storytelling process, then prepare them for broadcasting and share them in the relevant media.

Qualifications:

Proficient in operating professional video cameras. 

Knowledge of composition, lighting, and audio techniques for high-quality video production. 

Experience with different types of shots and camera movements. 

Skilled in video editing software (e.g., Adobe Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro). 

Ability to edit and enhance video content to tell a compelling story. 

Familiarity with adding graphics, effects, and transitions. 

Understanding of narrative structure and storytelling techniques. 

Ability to capture and convey a story visually. 

Creativity in translating ideas into engaging visual content. 

Knowledge of video formats, codecs, and compression techniques. 

Understanding of different types of cameras, lenses, and other video equipment. 

Ability to troubleshoot technical issues related to recording and editing. 

Familiarity with various social media platforms (e.g., Instagram, YouTube, Facebook). 

Understanding of social media trends and best practices. 

Ability to optimize content for different platforms.

- Disaster Assembly Secretariat (1-2 people): 

Role: a key administrative and coordination role in supporting the Disaster Assembly, ensuring smooth operations and effective communication among volunteers, stakeholders, and community members. Provide administrative assistance in planning, organizing, and executing Disaster Assembly meetings and related activities. Maintain accurate records of attendance, minutes, and action items during assemblies. Assist in the preparation and distribution of communication materials related to Disaster Assembly activities. Manage documentation, filing, and archiving of relevant assembly records and reports. 

Qualifications: 

Proven experience in administrative support roles, preferably in a community or disaster response setting. 

Excellent organizational and multitasking skills with a keen attention to detail. 

Strong communication skills, both written and verbal. 

Proficient in using office software (e.g., Microsoft Office, Google Workspace) and basic data management tools. 

Ability to work collaboratively in a team and engage positively with diverse groups. 

Familiarity with disaster response terminology and processes is desirable. 

Flexibility and adaptability to respond to changing needs and priorities. 

Empathy, patience, and a commitment to community service.

- Disaster Assembly Facilitator (1 person): 

Role: Coordinating and leading a volunteer-driven Disaster Assembly in a disaster-affected area. Additionally, organizing regular assemblies for participants in the Living Lab, fostering community engagement, and preserving the project's results. 

Qualifications: 

Proven experience in facilitating group discussions and leading meetings effectively. 

Ability to guide volunteers in assessing and reporting on disaster-related issues. 

Strong leadership skills to coordinate and motivate a diverse group of volunteers. 

Understanding of disaster response and recovery processes. 

Familiarity with the specific challenges and issues faced by the community in the disaster area. 

Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to communicate complex information in a clear and accessible manner. 

Comfortable presenting updates, findings, and project results to diverse audiences. 

Experience in community engagement and outreach. Ability to build and maintain positive relationships with volunteers and community members. 

Skill in fostering a sense of community and collaboration among participants. 

Strong organizational and project management skills. Ability to plan and execute regular assemblies, ensuring they are productive and engaging. 

Experience in tracking and reporting on project outcomes. 

Ability to work collaboratively with volunteers, community leaders, and other stakeholders. 

Skill in fostering a collaborative environment to maximize the impact of the disaster assembly. 

Empathy towards the challenges faced by the community. 

Cultural sensitivity and an understanding of diverse perspectives within the community. 

Strong analytical and problem-solving skills to address issues raised during assemblies. 

Ability to propose practical solutions and recommendations.

iii. Implementation Plan: 

- Activities and deliverables definition and responsible assignment 

To ensure the project's success, clear definitions of activities and associated deliverables will be established. Each task will be assigned to the appropriate team member based on expertise, ensuring accountability and precision in execution. This structured approach ensures that all team members have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities, promoting efficiency and coherence throughout the project's lifecycle. 

- Resources and Budget 

Resource allocation is pivotal for the smooth progression of any project. A detailed budget will be crafted, outlining the financial requirements for each phase of the project. This not only ensures optimal utilization of funds but also helps in forecasting any potential financial roadblocks. By mapping out resources in advance, the project can proceed without undue financial strain or unexpected shortages. 

- Time-sheet 

Time management is a cornerstone of effective project implementation. A comprehensive time sheet will be developed, indicating the start and end dates for each activity, as well as milestones and checkpoints. This tool will serve as a visual representation of the project timeline, allowing for easy tracking of progress, ensuring timely delivery, and providing a mechanism for early detection of potential delays.

6.2 Implementation

6.2.1 Step 1: Storytelling

This tool helps you share the experiences, gains, and benefits that people have achieved through their participation in the Living Lab and policy recommendations. 

a. Gathering Stories 

How to use: Conduct interviews or create surveys to gather stories from people who have participated in the Living Lab. Focus on their experiences, what they've learned, how they've benefited, and their views on policy recommendations. 

Expected Output: A collection of personal stories highlighting the impacts and benefits of participation in the Living Lab and policy recommendations. 

Relation to Other Phases: This step is a feedback loop to the Co-Creation and Co-Design phases (informing about the experiences of participants and potential areas of improvement). It also has ties to the Outreach phase as these stories can be used for awareness raising and encouraging others to join. 

Tools: video recorder (like camera etc.), interview questionnaire.

b. Sharing Stories 

How to use: Use various online and offline channels to share these stories. This could be through social media posts, newsletters, community meetings, etc. 

Expected Output: Greater awareness and understanding within the community about the value and impact of participating in the Living Lab and policy recommendations. 

Relation to Other Phases: The stories shared can attract new participants (Outreach phase) and can also be used as a tool for further ideation and problem-solving in the Co-Creation and Co Design phases. 

Tools: social media, newsletters, community meetings, project web site etc.

6.2.2 Step 2: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Incentives

Creating internal and external incentives encourages ongoing participation in the co-creation and co design phase. 

a. Evaluating the Participation Process 

How to use: Collect and analyze data on participation in the co-creation and co-design phase. This could include participation rates, feedback from participants, etc. 

Expected Output: An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the participation process, and insights into potential incentives that could increase engagement. 

Relation to Other Phases: The evaluation feeds into every other phase, as it can inform necessary modifications or enhancements in the Know, Co-Create, Co-Design, and Outreach phases. 

Tools: Intent to Participation Questionnaire.

b. Developing Incentives 

How to use: Based on your evaluation, develop internal and external incentives that will encourage participation. These incentives could be related to personal development, recognition, rewards, etc. 

Expected Output: A set of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives designed to encourage ongoing participation in the co-creation and co-design process. 

Relation to Other Phases: The development of incentives can be based on the understanding gained during the Know phase. The effectiveness of these incentives could be communicated during the Outreach phase and could also influence the Co-Create and Co-Design phases by encouraging more active participation. 

Tools: Focus Group Discussion Forms, Incentives Suggestion Forms.

6.2.3 Step 3: Assembly

The assembly ensures that participants in the Living Lab continue to engage and interact with each other after the project, maintaining the results and the sense of community. 

a. Organizing Assemblies 

How to use: Set up regular assemblies for people who participated in the Living Lab. These assemblies can be used to discuss ongoing issues, share updates, and maintain the sense of community. 

Expected Output: Regular assemblies that ensure continued engagement among participants and preservation of the project's results. 

Relation to Other Phases: These assemblies can serve as a platform for continual learning (Know phase), ideation (Co-Create phase), feedback and testing (Co-Design phase), and can also be a platform to showcase success stories (Outreach phase). 

Tools: Assembly Guideline, Deliverables.

7. OUTREACH  

7.1 Preparation

i. Problem Definition: Determining the strategies necessary for the products and ideas coming out of the living lab to reach the target audience. The main element to be considered here is that no community should be left out. It is important to use new technologies for this purpose. 

ii. Team Building: The team should consist of a maximum of 4-6 people under the leadership of a team leader. Team members can share the tasks of implementing online and offline outreach techniques. The team should have the following qualifications;

- Team Leader (1 person) 

Role: The role of the team leader in a project is to ensure the successful completion of the project and the effective operation of the team. 

Specifications: 

  • Leadership skills: A team leader should possess leadership qualities such as the ability to inspire, motivate and guide team members towards achieving project goals. The team leader should be able to make decisions, delegate tasks effectively and provide clear direction to the team.
  • Communication skills: Effective communication is essential for a team leader.
  • Knowledge of project management: A team leader should have a solid understanding of project management principles, methodologies and practices. Knowledge of project planning, scheduling, resource allocation and risk management. Proficiency in using project management tools and software is generally expected.
  • Organizational and planning skills: Team leaders need to be well organized and skilled at planning, prioritizing and coordinating tasks.

- Experts on online outreach techniques (2-3 peoples): 

Role: The role of the experts is to use online outreach tools to communicate the ideas and products from the living lab to the entire target audience. In this context, experts are responsible for the timing and full implementation of online outreach techniques and reporting the results. 

Specifications: 

  • Expertise: Experience in Content Marketing, Social media marketing and Email marketing techniques. Experience and knowledge in communication and collaboration with influencers. Having knowledge about conferences, webinars, etc.
  • Design: Design of platforms to promote user generated content.
  • Reporting: Preparing final analysis reports so that all actors can understand the results of the data analysis.

- Experts on offline outreach techniques (2-3 peoples): 

Role: The role of the experts is to use offline outreach tools to communicate the ideas and products from the living lab to the entire target audience. In this context, experts are responsible for the timing and full implementation of offline outreach techniques and reporting the results. 

Specifications: 

  • Expertise: Experience in community outreach, personalized outreach techniques. Experience and knowledge in the implementation and follow-up of referral programs. Knowledge of conferences, webinars, etc. Experience in partnership and collaborations with companies and institutions, knowledge in organizing workshops.
  • Design: Designing referral programs.
  • Reporting: Preparing final analysis reports so that all actors can understand the results of the data analysis.


iii. Implementation Plan: 

1. Define the target audience: At this stage, it is necessary to define the target audience correctly. Clearly define their demographic characteristics, interests and needs. 

2. Set clear objectives: In this section, the objectives to be achieved through outreach efforts should be determined. 

3. Choose appropriate channels: Determine which channels are the most effective for reaching your target audience. These channels can include online and offline outreach strategies. 

4. Create compelling messages: Messages that will have a significant impact on your target audience need to be developed. Emphasize the benefits, value or impact of your project in a clear and concise way. 

5. Create engaging content: Use a variety of content types to engage your target audience. 

6. Build partnerships: Look for opportunities to collaborate with relevant organizations or influencers that can help amplify your message to the target audience and expand your reach. 

7. Implement a consistent schedule: Develop a timeline and schedule for your outreach activities. A consistent schedule is an important tool in achieving goals. 

8. Monitor and analyze results: Regularly monitor the effectiveness of your outreach strategy. In this context, use the right measurement tools to check the effectiveness of your strategies.

7.2 Implementation

7.2.1 Step 1: Implement online outreach strategies

The goal of online outreach techniques is to increase your online visibility, reach a wider audience and engage with the target audience. Through online techniques, ideas and products from the living lab can be effectively delivered to the target audience via digital channels. 

a. Content Marketing: 

How to use: In this stage, the ideas and products from the Living lab will be disseminated to the target audience identified in the previous stages through content marketing. For example, creating and sharing valuable content such as blog posts, articles, videos or infographics that educate your target audience or contribute to solving their problems. 

Expected Output: The expected output is the dissemination of ideas and products from the Living lab to the entire target audience without excluding any group. 

Relation to Other Phases: In this phase, ideas and products resulting from the co-design of suitable solutions (Co-Design) and the development of relevant policies (Co-Creation) will be communicated to the target audience. 

Tools: Blog posts, Articles, Videos, Infographics, Podcasting, Ebooks.

b. Social media marketing: 

How to use: In this stage, the ideas and products from the Living lab will be conveyed to the target audience identified in the previous stages through social media marketing. We will use platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn to communicate ideas and products to the target audience and to interact with them. 

Expected Output: Social media marketing channels are expected to enable you to actively connect with individuals or communities through promoting your ideas and products. 

Relation to Other Phases: The ideas and products from all previous phases will be communicated to the entire target audience. 

Tools: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. 

c. Email marketing: 

How to use: In this stage, the ideas and products from the Living lab will be conveyed to the target audience identified in the previous stages through email marketing. The aim of this stage is to send targeted emails to your subscribers to provide them with updates, exclusive content, offers or personalized recommendations. 

Expected Output: Through email marketing, it is aimed to transfer the ideas and products produced in the project to the target audience in an interactive way. 

Relation to Other Phases: As with email marketing and social media marketing channels, ideas and products from all previous stages will be communicated to the entire target audience. 

Tools: Email. 

d. Influencer Collaboration: 

How to use: Partnering with influencers or thought leaders to amplify your message and reach a wider audience. This could include guest blogging, social media collaborations or influencer takeovers. 

Expected Output: With the collaboration of influencers or thought leaders, it will be possible to transfer the ideas and products produced in the project to the target audience faster and more effectively. 

Relation to Other Phases: In collaboration with an influencer or thought leader, as with other outreach channels, ideas and products from all previous stages will be communicated to the entire target audience. 

Tools: Influencers/thought leaders. 

e. Event Participation:

How to use: Attending or organizing project-related events, conferences or webinars to network with potential target audiences, share information or present your products/ideas. 

Expected Output: Participating in or organizing project-related events, conferences or webinars will enable effective communication with the target audience. 

Relation to Other Phases: By participating in or organizing project-related events, conferences or webinars, ideas and products from other phases will be shared with the potential target audience. 

Tools: Events, conferences, webinars. 

f. User-generated content: 

How to use: Promote and showcase content created by your target audiences, such as testimonials, reviews or user-submitted photos/videos. 

Expected Output: Increased interaction with the target audience and more effective transfer of project outputs. 

Relation to Other Phases: More effective dissemination of ideas and products that emerge at the end of all phases. 

Tools: Reviews, photos and videos.

7.2.2 Step 2: Implement offline outreach strategies  

At this stage, offline outreach techniques will be used to present ideas and products from the living lab to the target audience that cannot be reached with online outreach techniques. 

a. Community Outreach: 

How to use: Participate in local community events, sponsor charitable activities or support causes related to the project's outputs in order to build effective relationships with the target audience. 

Expected Output: Community outreach techniques aim to reach target audiences that cannot be reached through online tools. 

Relation to Other Phases: As with online outreach techniques, this phase aims to communicate the ideas and products produced in the other phases to the entire target audience. 

Tools: Local community events, sponsor charitable activities. 

b. Partnerships and Collaborations: 

How to use: Collaborate with complementary businesses or organizations to cross-promote the project's products/services or work together in joint initiatives. 

Expected Output: Collaboration with complementary businesses or organizations to cross-promote the project's products/services or work together in joint initiatives will ensure that the product and idea is more effectively communicated to the target audience.

Relation to Other Phases: In this phase, ideas and products resulting from the co-design of suitable solutions (Co-design) and the development of relevant policies (Co-creation) will be communicated to the target audience faster and more effectively through collaboration. 

Tools: Collaborate with complementary businesses or organizations. 

c. Personalized Outreach: 

How to use: Tailoring your communication to the target audience through personal emails, phone calls or content recommendations personalized to their specific needs or interests. 

Expected Output: Personalized content based on specific needs or interests will engage the target audience more effectively. 

Relation to Other Phases: In this phase, ideas and products resulting from the co-design of suitable solutions (Co-design) and the development of relevant policies (Co-creation) will be communicated to the target audience faster and more effectively through personalized contents. 

Tools: Emails and phone calls. 

d. Referral Programs: 

How to use: Implement referral programs that encourage the target audience to engage through rewards, discounts or special benefits. 

Expected Output: Target audience is directed to the project through rewards, discounts or special benefits. 

Relation to Other Phases: In this phase, ideas and products resulting from the co-design of suitable solutions (Co-design) and the development of relevant policies (Co-creation) will be communicated to the target audience faster and more effectively through referral programs. 

Tools: Referral programs. 

e. Event Participation: 

How to use: Attending or organizing workshops to network with potential target audiences, share information or present your products/ideas. 

Expected Output: Participating in or organizing workshops will enable effective communication with the target audience. 

Relation to Other Phases: By participating in or organizing workshops, ideas and products from other phases will be shared with the potential target audience. 

Tools: Workshops.

8. Guideline of Evaluation

8.1 Step 1: Preparation for Evaluation

i. Problem Definition 

Evaluation aims to effectively assess both the process and its individual steps. The evaluation seeks to answer the following questions: 

  • Are the outputs satisfactory?
  • Do the sub-components work in harmony with each other?
  • Can the entire process, along with its components, be improved?
  • What are the weaknesses in the process?

To find answers to the above questions, the objectives of all processes and sub-processes are initially determined. These objectives are then translated into measurable tools. 

ii. Team Building: 

Goals are established with the relevant coordinator in sub-processes. All objectives are consolidated, and the project team focuses on overall objectives. An external expert, outside the project team, interprets the process for all possible outcomes. The expert group may include different components such as assessment and evaluation experts, data experts, project managers, disaster management experts, and community scientists. 

iii. Implementation Plan: 

Evaluation tools set for pre-implementation, during implementation, and post-implementation are applied to the stakeholders at different intervals. Data are generated and then evaluated, as outlined in the Implementation section.  

8.2 Step 2: Implementation

Project processes encompass various sub-process management procedures. By amalgamating these sub-processes, the project is brought to completion. Consequently, evaluating a project entails the assessment of numerous distinct processes. Various metrics can be employed, including project inputs, overall process, sub-processes, outcomes, project outputs, degree of impact, sustainability, inclusiveness, as well as the validity and accuracy of measurement methods. 

Rowe and Frewer (2000) discovered that different Public Participation practices (such as Referenda, Public Hearings, Public Opinion Surveys, Consensus, Citizens Panels, and Focus Groups) each have their advantages and shortcomings in comparison to one another. Therefore, this section aims to provide a general evaluation method in itself. To mitigate complexity and enhance inclusiveness, the organizational structure depicted in Figure 5.2.1 has been devised for the Citizen Engagement Framework. According to Figure 5.2.1, four distinct evaluations have been adopted: input, process, output, and sub-process. Galais et al.'s (2021) study was adapted for the evaluation of the Input, Process, and Output processes. However, assessing sub processes is a pivotal stage in observing how these processes operate. Hence, a new process evaluation scale was developed by incorporating sub-process evaluation into the existing structure.


 Figure 5.2.1: Organizational structure of the evaluation process

8.2.1 Input Evaluation 

This section covers 'Know', 'Raise Awareness', 'Co-design & Co-creation', and 'Outreach' in framework formation. It evaluates the adequacy of the inputs generated for a framework. The evaluation criteria and their respective weights for this part are presented in Table 5.2.1. 


Table 5.2.1: Input evaluation criteria weights (Adaptation by Galais et al., 2021).

Variable

Factor Loading

Uniqueness

Resources +

0.82

0.33

Declared objective values: public policies

0.8

0.35

Perceptions on composition: diversity+

0.56

0.68

Perceptions on composition: all important stakeholders are present+

0.6

0.64

For the measurement of the marked variables in Table 5.2.1, participants should be asked the questions in Table 5.2.2. Factor Loading in Table 5.2.1 represents the importance weight of the criterion. Uniqueness also represents the discriminating power of the criterion.

Table 5.2.2: Questions to ask stakeholders for input evaluation

Do you think this training met your needs for disaster preparedness organization? (Know)

Full

Few deficiencies

Moderate

Mediocre

Did not meet

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think the participants in the organization represent the whole society? (Know)

Full

Few deficiencies

Moderate

Mediocre

Did not meet

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think the participation of Civil Society Organizations (Red Crescent, Afad, etc.) is fully ensured? (Know)

Full

Few deficiencies

Moderate

Mediocre

Did not meet

5

4

3

2

1

8.2.2 Process Evaluation:

The Process phase begins with making preliminary preparations for the Framework after the planning stage has been completed. Therefore, ensuring the consistency, applicability, and sustainability of these preparations with the actual implementation is crucial. Specifically, democratic participation of stakeholders, the quality of their representation, the ability to arrive at a collective decision, and the effectiveness of decision implementation are key criteria for evaluating the process. Table 5.2.3 has been created to outline these criteria. In the table, some criteria can be assessed directly, while those marked with a + are measured using the questions in Table 5.2.4.

Table 5.2.3: Process evaluation criteria weights (Adaptation by Galais et al., 2021)

Variable

Factor 1

loading

Deliberation

Factor 2 loading

Voice

Factor 3

loading

Wardship

Uniqueness

Members voice their opinions

 

0.93

 

0.14

Members vote

 

0.93

 

0.13

Decision making rules: simple

majority

 

 

 

0.35

 

Satisfaction with information +

0.88

 

0.78

 

0.22

Agree with: the interaction

within the members of the

plenary proceeds

constructively

0.88

0.78

 

0.22

 

Agree with: the interaction

within the members of the

plenary proceeds

constructively

0.87

 

 

0.20

Decision making methods:

assent, routinely+

 

 

 

0.23

The president & vice-president

represent the public

administration

 

 

 

0.28

Deliberation, Voice, and Wardship represent three different measurement approaches. Some criteria are measured directly, while others are observed indirectly. For example, Deliberation factors are assessed by forming a general opinion through questioning, while Voice is directly observable, depending on the participants' ability to express their views. Wardship indirectly represents the reflection of the impact of the decisions made. In other words, it reflects the degree to which it is realized.


Table 5.2.4: Questions to ask stakeholders for process evaluation


Do you see the participants as aligned and optimistic to make an effective decision (Co-design and Co-create)?

​There is complete harmony

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

It is difficult to reach a consensus.

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think the content of the training is satisfactory for disaster preparedness?

​There is complete harmony

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

It is difficult to reach a consensus.

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think there was a good discussion (Co-design and Co-create)?

​There is complete harmony

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

It is difficult to reach a consensus.

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think the decisions were taken according to the majority?

​Yes

No

5

0


8.2.3 Output Evaluation:

The reflections of the work on the society, the implementation of the decisions taken, sustainability and the predicted impact are very important. These criteria provide important feedback for the development of the framework and also provide important information about the value of the work. Outputs were measured on two key factors: impact and transparency. The starting point for these two factors is the impact of the study on society and how transparently the data is shared. Table 5.2.5 has been created to outline these criteria. In the table, some criteria can be assessed directly, while those marked with a + are measured using the questions in Table 5.2.6.


Table 5.2.5: Output evaluation criteria weights (Adaptation by Galais et al., 2021)


Variable

Factor 1

loading

Deliberation

Factor 2 loading

Voice

Uniqueness

The council has a Social Networking site profile

 

0.72

0.48

AC reports and recommendations available online

 

0.79

0.37

Website is kept updated

 

0.78

0.39

 

AC effects: the content of the policy changes+

0.8

 

 

0.35

Quality of advice assessment. Subjective scale+

0.85

 

0.27

 

Satisfaction with the performance of the council. Subjective scale+

0.92

 

0.14

Some criteria for output evaluation are measured using the questions in Table 5.2.6.


Table 5.2.6: Questions to ask stakeholders for output evaluation

​Do you think that the decisions we took at the event were fully implemented? (Result Evaluation)

Exactly​

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not Implemented​

5

4

3

2

1

Do you think the decisions taken at the event were important? (Importance Evaluation / Ranking of Results Evaluation)

​Very Important

​Important

Medium Important

​Partially

Not Important

5

4

3

2

1

Are you satisfied with the decisions taken?

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

8.2.4 Sub-Process Evaluation:


A system is formed by the combination of smaller parts. The quality and compatibility of these system parts are important criteria for the improvement of the system. In order to evaluate the entire framework, five basic components were examined. Since this measurement addresses a highly specialized subject, a simple measurement method is adopted. The number of questions is multiplied by 5 (measurement range), and the measurement is determined by calculating the percentage between the highest possible score and the actual score achieved in the application. This measurement is shown in formula 1.


Variables:


𝑓𝑠𝑖: The degree of success achieved for the 𝑖𝑡ℎ component in the framework section.


Q: The set of survey questions in the relevant section.


q: Question in the relevant section.


r: Scaling interval. A scale of 5 was created for this.


v: The degree to which the relevant attribute is provided by the respondent or respondents. For this, the average value of the whole questionnaire is taken for each question.


𝑓𝑠𝑖=Σ𝑄𝑞𝑞𝑣Σ𝑄𝑞𝑞𝑟 (1)


8.3 KNOW section

The 'KNOW' phase involves designing the community that will be created for the framework and determining the type of dataset that will be generated. The evaluation aims to measure the extent to which the two main objectives of the questions have been met. Through the use of five different ratings, the 'KNOW' phase is assessed. The questions prepared for the KNOW section are shown in Table 5.2.7.


Table 5.2.7: Questions to ask stakeholders for KNOW section

Assess the extent to which data from existing databases is adequate to describe community disaster risks and vulnerabilities. (Data Adequacy)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess the reliability and validity of the data collection tools used in the survey and focus group research [reliability and validity should be assessed separately for each of the survey and focus group interview forms]. (Data Reliability)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess the reliability and validity of the data collection tools used in the survey and focus group research [reliability and validity should be assessed separately for each of the survey and focus group interview forms]. (Reliability of Data Collection Tools)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate the representativeness of the samples in the questionnaire and focus group surveys to the main population [questionnaire and focus group surveys should be evaluated separately]. (Representativeness of the Sample)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether a complete list of groups vulnerable to disaster risk can be created with all the data collected. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether a complete list of groups vulnerable to disaster risk can be created with all the data collected. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

With all the data collected, assess whether all key stakeholders involved in disaster risk reduction and disaster awareness are listed. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether the data analyses revealed the roles and relationships of key stakeholders and their impact on society. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

After data analysis, assess whether the needs at different levels (such as topographic, community and individual) posed by disaster risks have been clearly identified [each level need can be assessed separately]. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

After data analysis, assess whether stakeholders can be categorized according to their level of participation in accordance with the ladder of participation. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

After the data analysis, assess whether the power and vulnerability levels of the participants against disaster risks can be revealed. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether the data analyses reveal the opportunities and barriers to participation of the participants. (Data Effectiveness)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

8.4 Raise Awareness Section

It encompasses all actions taken to increase the impact, spread and awareness of Framework in society. Social media, print media, posters, announcements, announcements, etc. are examples of these actions. The degree of impact of these actions for the Framework is actually the success of this section. The survey questions asked to the participants in Table 5.2.8 measure the success of this section.


Table 5.2.8: Questions to ask stakeholders for the Raise Awareness section.

​How clear and concise was the identified policy issue during the raise awareness phase? (Policy Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not clear

5

4

3

2

1

How effectively were the roles and competences defined and adhered to during the raise awareness phase? (Resource Competence Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

How effectively were the activities, deliverables, and responsibilities assigned and executed during the raise awareness? (Planning Effectiveness Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

How accurately was the time-sheet followed during the raise awareness? (Execution of the Project Planning Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not accurate

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether all stages of the communication strategy plan are planned effectively and efficiently? (Planning Effectiveness Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether visibility is ensured to cover vulnerable groups in advertising activities. (Impact Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not visible

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether visibility is ensured to cover vulnerable groups in news and programs. (Impact Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not visible

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate the compatibility of the invited media professionals in relation to the power-impact matrix (very compatible, compatible, neither compatible nor not compatible, not compatible)? (Resource Competence Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

How effectively were media professionals informed and documents shared during the media meetings? (Resource Competence Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether all stages of the Media Planning Strategy are planned effectively and efficiently? (Planning Effectiveness Evaluation)

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether visibility is ensured to cover vulnerable groups in new media and website.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not satisfied

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether all stages of the Media and Media Professional Mapping are planned effectively and efficiently?

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not effective

5

4

3

2

1

Assess whether the data of media professionals is obtained and stored in a qualified manner.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not obtained

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate that all media records are obtained and stored in a quality manner.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not obtained

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether the talks activities have improved community understanding of disaster risks and mitigation.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not Understand

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether the talks activities have improved community understanding of disaster risks and mitigation

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not understand

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether the stalls and home visiting have improved community understanding of disaster risks and mitigation.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not understand

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluate whether the trainings have improved community understanding of disaster risks and mitigation.

Exactly

​They lack a little

Moderate

​There is a lot missing

Not Understand

5

4

3

2

1